Hair-working machine

  • Inventors:
  • Assignees:
  • Publication Date: December 22, 1891
  • Publication Number: US-465741-A

Abstract

Claims

6 Sheets-Sheet 1. (No Model.) G A. WILLIAMS HAIR WORKING MACHINE. No. 465,741. Pizmteggized Dec. 22, 1891. INVENTOH WITNESSES: MW Wax A T70RNEYS 6 Sheets-Sheet 2. (No Model.) G. A. WILLIAMS. HAIR WORKING MAGHINE. INVENTOH Patented Dec. 22, 1891. W/TNESSES Mm (m ATTORNEYS 6 Sheets-Sheet 3. (No Model.) G. A. WILLIAMS. HAIR WORKING MACHINE. No. 465,741. Patented 13190.22, 1891. h hmf W/TNESSES: ATTORNEYS (No Model.) 6 Sheets-Sheet 4. G. A. WILLIAMS. HAIR WORKING MACHINE. No. 465,741. Patented Dec. 22, 1891. s Sheets-Sheet 5. (No Model.) G. A. WILLIAMS. HAIR WORKING MACHINE. Patented Dec. 22, 1891. M VENTOR W/ TN E 885 S Mm A TTOH'NEYS m: mums nuns 00., mow-mum, wAsnmcTaN, u. c. 6 Sheets-Sheet 6. (No Model.) G. A. WILLIAMS. HAIR WORKING MACHINE. No. 465,741. Patented Dec. 22, 1891. INVENTOB: xwm nm. E 8 S M U W Qlwn/ m ATIORNEYS m: "cams Perms co.. mom-mum, WASWNGTON, n. c. GEORGE A. \VILLIA PATENT Orricn. .5, OF SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA. i HAlR=WORKING MACHINE. SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 465,741, dated December 22, 1891. Application filed March 25, 1891. To aZZ whom t it may concern.- Be it known that I, GEORGE A. 'WILLIAMS, of San Diego,in the county of San Diego and State of California, have invented a new and Improved l'Iairorking Machine, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description. 7 My invention relates to improvements in hair-working machines; and the object is to produce a machine which will automatically draw the hair through a web of loose cloth or other material, which will knot the hair so that it cannot get loose, and which may be used for securing any fibrous material to any suitable web or body. To this end my invention consists in a hairworking machine constructed substantially hereinafter described and claimed. Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, in which similar figures of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views. Figure 1 is a plan view of the machine einbodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the same. Fig. 3 is a vertical crosssection on the line 3 3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is a sectional front elevation on the line fl: at of Fig. Fig. 5 is a broken enlarged detail viewof one of the spring rollers used for winding the web or apron. Fig. 6 is a broken onlarged detail view of the mechanism for regulatingthe feed and the length of the stitches. Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail sectional view on the line 7 7 of Fig. 2, showing the arrangement of the feed mechanism and of the rollers which carry the web or apron. Fig. 8 is an enlarged detail view showing the relative position of the web or apron, the cross-bar which supports the cloth, the hair-shuttle, and the needle and needle-bar, the needle being shown as it passes above the cloth and grasps the hair. Fig. 9 is an enlarged detail sectional view showing the relative position of the cloth-holding cross-bar and shuttle which carriesthe hair and needle and needle bar, the needle being turned away from the web and traveling in the direction to release itself from the hair. Fig. 10 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the hair-shuttle, showing the hair secured therein. Fig. 11 is a detail view of a modified form of shuttle having an auxiliary spring to increase the press- Sen'al No. 386,366. (No model.) tire of the ordinary spring; and Fig. 12 is an enlarged detail view, partlyin sect-ion, of the preferred form of needle. The machine-frame comprises a flat base 10, which is supported upon legs 11, and a forwardly-extending U-shaped frame 12, which is secured to the legs and the plane of which is lower than the plane of the base 10, and mounted on opposite ends of the base 10,near the center, are brackets 13, which carry a horizontal shaft let, and the shaft is provided with a pulley 15, which connects by a belt 16 with a driving-shaft 17 below the'hase, although it may be driven by any suitable power, and theshaft 14: is provided with cam wheels and gears, which will be hereinafter described, and which operate the various parts of the machine. On opposite ends of the base 10, near the front edge, are brackets 18, which extend upward and forward, and which at their upper ends are provided with inwardly-extending studs 19, which are pivoted on the brackets and are secured by nuts 011 the outer threaded ends of the studs. The studs 19 support the vertically-aligning cross-bars 20 and 21, the bar 20 being arranged above the studs and the bar 21 below and both bars being securely clamped to the studs by means of suitable bolts. 'lhelowercross-bar 21 is thickened at the ends and provided with depending arms 22, which arms at their lower ends are united by another cross-bar 23, which serves as a bearing and support for the needle-bars 24, the upper ends at of which extend vertically through said cross-bar and through the bars 20 and 21, the needle-bars being each provided with a gear-wheel 25, which meshes with a rack 26 in the rear of the cross-bars, and the rack is held to slide in a suitable casing 27. It will thus be seen that when the rack is moved horizontally the gear-wheels will be turned and the needle-bars will turn in their bearings. Therack 26hasablocl 28 secured to the back side thereof, and this block connects with a clip 29, and the clip is'grasp'e'd by the forked end of an arm 30, the arm extending rearward and being secured to a vertical shaft 31, which is mounted in hearings in the cross-bar 32, which cross-bar extends horizontally above the base 10 and is secured at the ends to the brackets 18. The lower end of the shaft 31 has an arm 0-) secured thereto, which arm extends rearwardly above the shaft 14 and is provided at its end with a depending truck, (indicated by dot-ted lines in Fig. 1,) and the truck runs in a cam-groove 34 in the cam 35, the groove being arranged so that when the shaft is turned the arm 33 will be moved to the right and left, and this movement will rock the shaft 31, move the arm 30, and cause the rack 26 to be moved horizontally and to turn the needle-bars. A U-shaped frame 36 is clamped upon the ends of the cross-bar 23, and the frame extends rearward and is secured to a rod 37, which rod passes back over the shaft 14 and is pivoted to the upper end of a bell-crank 38, and the bell-crank is pivoted at its elbow in a bracket 39 on the back part of the base 10, and the lower arm of the bell-crank extends forward and terminates in a truck 40, which enters a groove 40 in the side of the cam 41, the cam being fixed to the shaft 14, and the groove on the cam is such that when the cam is revolved it will tilt the bell-crank and cause the rod 37, the frame 36, the cross-bar 23, and the needle-bars mounted therein to be moved backward and forward, the cam being timed to operate in unison with other cams, and this operation will be fully set forth in describing the general operation of the machine. The lower ends 24 of the needle-bars are provided at their upper ends with forks 42, and the lower ends of'the upper portions 24 of the needle-bars are provided with similar forks, the forks being united by a universal joint 43 and the needle-bars being held downward by springs 44, which encircle the upper members of the needle-bars between the upper forks 42 and cross-bar 23. It will thus be seen that the upper and lower portions of the needle-bars maybe brought into different positions and that the universal joint enables the bars to be twisted into any necessary shape. It is necessary at certain timesin the operation of the machine to move the lower memptviltfil at its rear end to a bell-crank 50, which is pivoted at its elbow in a bracket 51 on the rear portion of the base 10. The lower arm of the elbow-lever extends forward and terminates in a truck 50, which runs in a cam-groove 52 in the side of a cam-pulley 53, which cam is secured to the shaft 14, and the cam-groove in the pulley 53 and the camgroove in the pulley 41 are timed in relation to each other, so that at one movement they will move the upper and lower members of the needle-bars forward in nearly a vertical line, and at another movement the lower members will move the faster, so that the needlebars will be bent and the needle in the lower end of the bars will assume a higher position than at the first movement. This operation will be clearly described in explaining the general operation of the machine. I The needle-bars are provided at their lower ends with hook-shaped needles 24, which are secured by set-sorews, and, as shown in the main views, the needles are single needles, which terminate in hooks at the points; but the preferred form is shown in Fig. 12, in which the main member of the needle is slotted at its lower end, as shown at 24, and terminates in a hook 24, the main portion or body of the needle having on the inner side a spring 24", between which and the body is a slot, the lower end of which abuts with the inner end of the hook 24 It will thus be seen that the needle may easily be thrust through a piece of cloth or web, and the operation will pull back the springso that the hook 24 may grasp the hai r and pull it through the cloth, and it will be again released when the needle is pulled away from the cloth in the manner hereinafter described. It will be noticed that the cross-bars 20, 21, 23, and 45 and the connecting-arms constitute a swingingframe for the needle-bars, and this frame is guided by arms 54, which arms are secured to the inner sides of the brackets 18 and extend forward, so as to press against the outer sides of the arms 46. Each of the brackets' 18 is provided on the outer side near the upper end with depending slotted guides 18 and in the rear of these guides with vertical supports 18, which carry shafts 55, the shafts being arranged at each end of the machine, and the shafts extend forward through. the guides 18, which prevent their displacement. The shafts 55 are mounted in pivoted boxes 56, held in the supports 18", and the shafts extend through sleeves 57, which are secured in the boxes, and it will thus be seen that the ITS shafts may be tilted vertically in the pivoted boxes and that they maybe moved longitudinally, being held to slide in the sleeves 57. The forward ends of the shaft are provided with depending crank-arms 58, which support the shuttle-frame 59, and the shuttle-frame comprises the back plate 60, the front plate 61, and the two end plates 62, which unite the front and back plates, and the front and back plates are placed at an angle to each other, the point of the angle being on the underside. The end plates or clips 62, which fasten together the front and back plates of the shuttle-frame, are slotted at the ends, as best shown in Fig. 2, and the back plate is fastened to the end plates by suitable set-screws, the upper set-screws extending through the slot, and it will be seen that the front and back plates may be placed in any desired position in relation to each other and held there by the set-sore Ws. On the under side of the shuttle-frame are the perforated shuttle-cases 63, which are preferably rectangular in shape and which are open at each end. These cases carry the shuttles Oat, which are preferably made of sheet metal and which are perforated on the sides, the perforations being made to correspond with the perforations of the shuttlecase. The shuttle-spring 65 are made to extend longitudinally through the shuttle and comprise two spring members 66, which are long enough to extend through the shuttle and which are provided with laterally-extending pins 67, which project outward through the perforations of the shuttle and shuttle-case, and the members are united at one end by a ring 68, which serves to give them the necessary spring. pushed through the shuttle, so that it will come between the outer ends of the shuttlespring and the shuttle-case, and it will be held in position by the tension of the springs, and as the hair is withdrawn the pins on the springs will project through the perforations in the shuttle and shuttlecase, so that the springs are allowed to press continuously upon the hair and maintain an even tension. In Fig. ll I have shown a modified form of the shuttle, the shuttle 6d being slotted on the under side, and the shuttle is provided with a spring 63, which is coiled at the center and is held in a keeper 63 the free ends of the spring extending upward through the slots in the shuttle between the members of the shuttle spring, so that this auxiliary spring will give an increased tension to the shuttle-spring by forcing the members of the latter apart, and this modified form will be found very convenient in certain kinds of work, where it is found necessary to maintain a strong tension on the hair. The shuttleframe and shuttles are given the necessary vertical and side movements by means of the shafts 55 and the mechanism connected there with. The mechanism for operating the shafts and shuttle-frame is as follows: Near each end of the main shaft 14 is a double cam-pulley 70, which has an irregular groove 71 in its face, with a branch groove 72 opening from one side of it and which has a side groove 73 in the outer side. The face-grooves in the campulleys are intended to give the necessary side movement to the shaftsand sh uttle-frame, and the side grooves 7 2 and 7 3 are adapted to give the necessary vertical and longitudinal movement to theshafts and frame. Each shaft 55 is provided at a point above the pulley 70 with a depending rod 74, which'is secured thereto by a clamp 75 and which extends downward through the groove 71 and terminates in a truck 76, which enters the groove 72. It will thus be seen that by means of this rod The hair 69 is doubled over and and connections each shaft is given a vertical movement by the side groove and a sidewise movement by the face-groove of the pulley. Each shaft 55 is provided at its rear end with a cam 77, to which is pivoted a forked arm 78 and the rear end of the arm is pivoted to an elbow-lever 79, which is pivoted at its elbow in a bracket 80 on the back side of the base 10. The lower arm of the elbow-lever 79 extends forward and terminates in a truck 81, which enters the outside groove 7 3 of the cam-pulley 70, and it will thus be seen that when the pulley is revolved the arm will be tilted and will give a longitudinal movement to the shaft 55, which will impart a forward movement to the shuttle-frame. It will be noticed that the pivoted connection between the elbow-lever and the shaft permits the shaft to be tilted vertically; that the face-groove of the pulley 70, operating on the rod 7 4 and the shaft, gives the sidewise movement to the shaft; that the side groove 72 gives the necessary vertical movement to it, which movement is permitted on account of the loose connection of the elbow-lever, as described, and by means of these three movements the shafts 55 and the shuttle-frame connected with the shafts are brought into any desired position, and the object of these different positions will appear when the operation of the machine is explained. Beneath the needle-bar frameis a carriage which carries the aprons and the cloth to which the hair is secured, the carriage consisting, chiefly, of the triangular side plates 82, which are arranged with their bases downward and which are held to slide on the rods 83, the said rods extending horizontally through the front and rear portions of the plates and having their ends firmly secured to the frame 12. A shaft 84: extends horizontally through the upper portion of the carriage-plates S2, and one end of the shaft is mounted in a bracket 85, and said end is provided outside the bracket with a beveled gearwheel 86, which is keyed to the shaft in such a manner that when it turns the shaft will also turn,but so that the shaft may slide longitudinally through it. The gear-wheel S6 meshes with a similar gear-wheel 87, which is secured to the end of a shaft 88, said shaft being supported at the end adjacent to the gear-wheel in a branch 85 of the bracket 85, and the opposite end of the shaft extends rearward to a point adjacent to the drivingshaft let, is mounted in a suitable supportingbracket 89, and is provided with abeveled gear-wheel at the end, which gear-wheel meshes with a similar gear-wheel 91 on the end of the shaft 14:, so that when the shaft 14: is turned the shaft 8% will be also turned. The shaft St is provided near each end at a point just outside the carriage-plates 82 with a sprocket-wheel 92, over which extend chains 93, and the chains pass around guidepulleys 94:, which are pivoted on studs on the lower portions of the carriage-plates, the studs and pulleys being located at the front and rear parts thereof. The chains 93 are connected by rods 05, there being three of these rods which are regularly spaced, and as the chains revolve the rods will be carried with them and will serve to brush the hair away from the needles when the machine is being operated. The sprocket-wheels 02 also serve as cam-wheels, as they have a cam-groove 06 in their inn er sides, and these grooves receive studs which extend laterally from the plates 97, which plates are held against the outer sides of the carriage-plates and are connected by a cross-rod 98. It will thus be seen that as the sprocket-wheels revolve the plates and theirconnecting-rod will be alternately raised and lowered, so as to cause the cross-rod to press upon the hair which is being operated on and give to it the necessary tension, and the plates and rod are normally pressed downward and their downward movement facilifated by springs 09, which are secured to the under sides of the carriage-plates 82, and the free ends of which enter the lower slotted end 97 of the plates 97. Extending across from plate to plate in the lower portion of the front and rear of the carriage are the spring-rollers 100, which are mounted at one end in one of the plates 82, and at opposite ends in slotted brackets 101, which are secured to the plates, and the springrollers carry aprons 102 and the cloth or web to which the hair is secured, the rollers-serving to keep the cloth taut and to wind it up as fast as it is fed forward. Each roller is provided with a hollow case 103, which is suitably covered, a shaft 104, which extends longitudinally through the case, having one end squared so as to rest in the socket of the bracket 101, and a spring 105, coiled around the shaft and having one end secured to the shaft and the other to the case in a common and well-known manner. The shaft 1041 has a ratchet-wheel 106 at one end, which is provided with one or two teeth, (two in the drawings,) and which is engaged by a pawl 107, secured to one end of the case 103, and when the pawl drops into one of the notches of the ratchet-wheel it prevents the roller from turning. The roller is provided on its face with a groove extending longitudinally across it, as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 5, and awire 108 fits closely in the groove, the Wire being shown partially withdrawn in Fig. 5, and the apron 102 is secured to the roller by placing it in the groove and then forcing the wire into the groove upon the apron. Mounted in the plates above the front rpller 100 are the rear feed-rolls 100 and 110, whiclFare arranged diagonally, so that the opening between them will align with the roller 100, and the shafts 111 of the rolls extend through the plates and are provided with gear-wheels 112, which mesh together, so that the rolls will be turned in unison. The rolls are intended to feed the cloth 113, which is to be operated upon, and which is to have the hair fastened to it, and the cloth is secured at one end to the front apron 102, which is rolled upon the front spring-roller, and the rear end of the cloth is secured to the rear apron which is wound upon the rear roller, and the rolls are arranged so that they will normally wind the cloth from the front to rear, but they are only operated after the feed-rollers 100 and 110 have been operated, as ordinarily the friction of the feed-rolls hold the cloth so that it cannot be wound by the rollers. The rear apron extends beneath the tension-rod 114, which extends across the back part of the carriage, and is mounted in the plates 82, and the cloth 113 extends over a cross-bar 115, which cross-bar is fixed to the upper end of the carriage-plates 82, and is inclined on its upper sides, so that it forms an edge at the top, and the inclined sides enable the needles to easily pass through the cloth which is stretched upon it. The cross-bar 115 is provided at each end with a depending slotted plate 116, whichis secured to the plates 82 by set-screws 117, and by means of the slotted plate and set-screws the height of the crossbar may be regulated. ()n the inner side of each plate 82, near the top, are projecting studs 118, which align horizontally and which are arranged just within the path of the cloth 113, and these studs carry grooved pulleys 119, over which passes an endless chain 120, the chain also passing overthe end of the crossbar 115, and the cross-bar is recessed at each end, so as to accommodate the chains. These chains 120 are provided on their outer sides with projecting pins 121, and the pins pierce the cloth 113 and keep it stretched from side to side of the carriage, so that when the needles operate upon it it will not be puckered in the center. The shaft 111 of the lower feed-roller 109 extends through one of the plates 82, and is mounted in a bracket 122, which is secured to the frame 12, and the outer end of the shaftis provided with a keyway 111" to receive a bolt in the hub of the sprocket-wheel 123, which is mounted upon the shaft, so that the sprocket-wheel will turn with the shaft, and the shaft may slide longitudinally when the carriage is moved. The ratchet-wheel 123 and the mechanism connected therewith is intended to turn the feed-rolls 109 and 110, so as to move the cloth after the hair has been stitched to it and bring a new portion of the cloth into the line of the needles. The ratchet-wheel 123 is operated by a spring-pressed pawl 124:, which pawl is pivoted on a pawl-post 125, that extends upward from the shaft 111, and the pawl-post is pulled rearward, so as to operate the ratchetwheel by means of a bar 126, which is held to slide in a keeper126 on the main frame, and is provided with a shoulder 127 on the under side, by means of which it is operated, as hereinafter described. A post 128 is secured to the bracket 122 and extends upward adjacent to and a little in front of the pawl-post 125, and secured diagonally to the upper portion of this post is a rod 129, which has a slot 130 centrally therein, through which extend setscrews 131 into the post 128, by means of which setscrews the rod and post are secured together. The front end of the rod 129 is connected with the upper end of the pawl-post 125 by a spring 131, and this spring serves to pull forward the pawl-post 125 and pawl 12% after they have been pulled forward by the rod 126, and it will be seen that by regulating the position of the rod 129 in relation to the post 128 the length of the feed will be regulated, as when the rod is set well ahead the tension of the spring will be strong and the pawl-post and pawl will be pulled well forward, so that when the rod 126 is pulled to the rear the ratchetwheel and the feed-rolls connected therewith willbeturned acorrespondinglylong distance; but when the rod 129 is adjusted so as to weaken the strength of the spring the pawl will not be pulled so far forward and the length of the feed will be correspondingly shortened. The feed mechanism is intended to operate S2 and the rolls therein has been moved to the extent of its movement, and the following mechanism is employed for accomplishing this result, and also for feeding the carriage to the right and left, so that the strands of hair will be secured to the cloth at the proper. point: A shaft 132, carrying a ratchet-wheel 131, is mounted in a bracket 133 in the rear of the bracket 122 and shaft 111, and pivoted on the shaft so as to extend upwardly therefrom is a pawl-post135, which carries a springpressed pawl 136, which meshes with the ratchet-wheel, and extending rearward from the pawl-post is a connecting-rod 137, which is pivoted at its rear end to vthe lower end of a vertical walking-beam 138, which walkingbeam is centrally pivoted on a bracket 139, which is secured to the base 10, and the upper en d of the walkingbeam is pivoted to a pitman 1 10, which extends rearwardl y above the base 10, and its rear end is formed into an eccentricstrap 141, which embraces an eccentric 1412, which eccentric is fixed to one end of the main shaft 1 1, which operates all the machine mechanism; and it will thus be seen that as the shaft is revolved the eccentric, by means of the connection just described, will turn the ratchetwheel 13-1 backward tooth by tooth, and to provide for having the ratchet-wheel turn faster or slower the pawl-post 135, which is secured to the connecting-rod 1237, is provided with a series of perforations, as best shown in Fig. 6, so that the connecting-rod may be secured to the pawl-post near the top or near the bottom, as the wheel is to be turned slow or fast. The shaft 132, which is carried by the ratchet-wheel, is provided on its inner end with a cam-pulley 1&3, which has an elliptical groove 144 extending around it, the groove being arranged so that a stud 145 on an arm ii'nmediately wind up the slack. 116, which enters the groove, will be moved from left to right and back again from right to left at one revolution of the cam-pulley, and the arm 146 is secured at its inner end to one of the carriageplates 82, so that when the shaft 132 is revolved the carriage will be moved first to the right and then to the left. A diamondshaped cam 147 is secured to the inner end of the shaft 132, and the shoulder 127 on the rod 126 is directly in the path of this cam and is operated when the points of the cam come in contact with the shoulder 127, so that the rod 126 will be operated at each half-revolution of the shaft 132 and at the same time that the carriage has finished its movement in one direction and starts back in the opposite direction. It willbe seen, then, that the ratchet-wheel 131 and the mechanism connected therewith regulates the number of stitches which will be taken during the movement of the carriage in one direction, which number maybe changed by changing the connection to the pawlpost, as described, and it will be noticed that when the carriage has completed its movement in one direction it will trip the rod 126 and will operate the ratchet-wheel 123 and the mechanism connected therewith, so as to turn the feed-rolls and bring the cloth to which the hair is secured into a position to receive another line of hair. The machine may be provided with any desired number of needle-bars and with a corresponding number of sh uttles; but in operation it is not necessary that all the needlebars need be provided with needles or all the shuttles with hair, enough being provided to attach the hair to a desired width of cloth. The operation of the machine is as follows: The cloth 113, to which the hair is secured, is attached to the aprons 102. The shuttleframe 59 is removed by slipping the'arms 58 from the shafts 55, so as to expose the carriage, and the rear apron is attached to the rear spring-roller and the aprons and cloth rolled upon the roller. The rearspring-roller is wound up to its utmost capacity by bringing forward the cloth a little and then allowing it to rewind in a common and well-known manner, and the roller is held so that it cannot unwind. The front spring-rolleris placed in position, and the front apron and cloth are brought under the tension-rod 114 over the cross-bar down between the rollers 109 and 110, the outer roller 110 being first removed and then reinserted in its place, in order that this may be easily done, and the front apron is then secured to the frontspringroller in the manner described; and it will thus be seen that the rollers and the feedrolls will keep the cloth perfectly taut, and that when the cloth is fed backward by the feed-rolls the spring in the rear roller will Care sho uld be taken in adjusting the cloth to have it the full width of the feed-carriage, so that the pins on the endless chains will penetrate IIO the cloth and hold it so that it will not draw to the center. The shuttle-frame is then replaced, and the shuttles which have first been filled with hair are placed in position in the shuttle-cases, with the doubled ends of the hair pointing inward. The machine is then started and the grooves in the cams 41 and 53 are adjusted in relation to each other, so that the elbow-levers 38 and 50 will be tilted at about the same time, and this movement swings forward the needle-frame and the needle-bars therein, the cross-bars 2.3 and 45 advancing at about the same rate, so that the needle-bars will be nearly straight and the needles will be pushed forward through that portion of the cloth 113 which is over the top edge of the cross-bar 115, and the hooks will thus enter the doubled ends of the hair which protrude from theinner ends of the shut-tles. The continued movement of the shaft 14 and the cam-wheels 41 and 53,.acting on the elbowlevers 38 and 50, then causes the needle-frame and needle-bars to swing backward, and each needle will pull the doubled end of a strand of hair back through the cloth and a little away from the cloth, the needles at this movement assuming the position indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 3. During this movement the plates 97, carrying the cross-rod 98, will have been raised, as shown in Fig. 8, and will start the same down, and the continued movement of the cam-wheels will start the needle-bars forward again, the lower cross-bar 45 moving a little faster than the upper cross-bar 23,thus bending the needle-bars so that the needles will pass above the cross-bar 115 and above the cloth thereon, carrying the joint with them, as shown in Fig. 8. During the latter forward movement of the needles the double camwheels at the ends of the shaft 14, acting on the elbow-lever 79, the vertical rod 74, and the shaft 75, will carry the shuttle-frame and the shuttles thereon upward and backward, then to one side, and then downward to the position indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 8, and then back to their first position, thus'bringing the strands of hair, which have been already looped, across the hooks of the needles. The continued movement of the cam-wheels starts back the needle-bars, thus pulling the strands through the loops already formed, and the cam-pulley 35, acting on the arms 33 and 30, the rock-shaft 31, and the rack 26, will turn the needles half round into the position shown in Fig. 9, and the other cams and the con nected levers will draw the needles and needlebars away from the carriage, as indicated in the same figure, so that the hooks will free themselves from the hair, and at about the time the needles are twisted, as described, the cam-grooves in the sprocket-wheels 92 will have brought down the plates 97 'and the cross-rod 98, so that the rod will impinge on the hair and give to it sufficient tension to draw the knot tight. As soon as the loop is formed a rod 95 will be carried up over the cross-bar 115 and down the back side of the carriage, th us carrying the hair to the rear portion of the cloth, and as these cross-rods travel at regular intervals they will serve to keep the hair on the back of the cloth. During the operations above described each needle will have tied or stitched a strand of hair into the cloth, and the operations comprise one revolution of the main shaft 14, so that the said movement will have turned the eccentric 142, which by its connected system of levers will have actuated the ratchet-wh eel 134 and cam-wheel 143, thus moving the carriage carrying the feed-rolls and cloth a distance of one stitch to the right and bringing a new portion of the cloth into position. to have the hair stitched to it, and the entire movement of the carriage will correspond to the distance between the needles, so that when it has been moved to its full length to the right or tothe left a complete row of hair strands will have been stitched to it, and the feed-rolls will be then actuated in the manner already described, so as to bring the cloth into position to receive another row of hair strands. I have shown and described the machine as adapted to fastening hair to cloth; but it is obvious that any fibrous material may be substituted for the hair, and that it may be secured to any convenient fabric. I have not shown in detail the various convolutions of the cams; but I have described the necessary movements of the ditterent parts of the machine and the mechanism connecting these parts with the cams, and it is obvious that the cam-grooves may be easily arranged to produce these movements. Having thus fully described my invention, 1 claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patentj 1. Ahair-working machine'comprisingaseries of swinging needle-bars carrying needles at their lower ends, a series of shuttles arranged opposite the needles, and a cloth-carrying carriage projectingbetween the needles and the shuttles, substantially as described. 2. A hair-working machine comprising a series of swinging needle-bars having hooked needles at their lower ends, a series of movable shuttles arranged opposite the needles, a cloth-carrying carriage projecting between the needles and shuttles, and a lever mechanism for simultaneously actuating the needles, shuttles, and carriage, substantially as described. 3. A hair-working machine comprisinga series of jointed swinging needle-bars having needles at their lower ends, a series of shuttles arranged opposite the needles, a clothcarrying carriage projecting between the needles and shuttles, and a lever mechanism for simultaneously actuating the needles, shut ties, and carriage, substantiallyas described. 4. A hai r-workin g machine comprising a series of swinging jointed needle-bars having needles at theirlower ends, a series of shuttles carried in a vertically and laterally movable frame arranged opposite the needles, a cloth -carrying carriage projecting between the needles and shuttle-frame, and means for simultaneously actuating the needles, shuttle-frame, and carriage, substantially as de scribed. 5. A hair-working machine comprising a series of swinging jointed needle-bars held to oscillate in a frame, a series of shuttles carried in a vertically and laterally movable frame arranged opposite the needles, aclothcarrying carriage projectingbetween the needles and shuttle, and means for simultaneously actuating the needles, shuttle-frame, and carriage, substantially as described. 6. A hair-working machine comprising a series of swinging jointed needle-bars carrying needles at their lower ends, a series of vertically and laterally movable shuttles arranged opposite the needles, a cloth-carryi11g carriage projecting between the needles and shuttles, and mechanism for moving the cloth in line with the needles and shuttles and for moving the carriage laterally, substantially as described. 7. A hair-working. machine comprising a se ries of swinging jointed needle-bars having needles at their lower ends, a series of shuttles mounted in a vertically and laterally movable frame arranged opposite the needles, a cloth-carrying carriage projecting between the needles and shuttles, and a feed mechanism for the cloth and carriage, substantially as described. 8. A hair-workingmachine comprising a swinging two-part frame having a series of jointed needle-bars journaled therein, the needle-bars having needles at their lower ends, a vertically and laterally movable shuttle-frame arranged opposite the needle-frame and carrying shuttles projecting opposite the needles, a cloth-carrying carriage projecting between the needles and shuttles, and a lever mechanism for simultaneously operating the needles, shuttle-frame, and carriage, substantially as described. 9. A hair-working machine comprisingase ries of swinging jointed needle-bars carrying needles at their lower ends, a series of vertically and laterally movable shuttles arranged opposite the needles, a cloth-carryin g carriage extending between the needles and shuttles, and a vertically-movable cross-rod'mounted in the carriage and held to move between the shuttles and needles, substantially as described. 10. In a hair-working machine, a swinging two-part needle-frame carrying jointed needle-bars adapted to receive needles at their lower ends, and independent lever mechanism for operating the upper and lower portions of the frame, substantially as described. 11. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a two-part swinging needle-fram e, of jointed needle-bars mounted therein and adapted to receive needles at their lower ends, and cam-operated means for swinging the upper and lower portions of the frame, substantially as described. 12. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a swinging two-part needleframe, of jointed needle-bars mounted vertically in the frame and adapted to receive needles at their lower ends, a lever mechanism for independently operating the upper and lower portions of the frame, and a rack and gear mechanism for oscillating the needle-bars, substantially as described. 13. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a swinging two-part needle-frame having cam'operated levers for operating the upper and lower portions thereof, of jointed needle-bars extending vertically through the frame and adapted to carry needles at their lower ends, gears fixed to the upper ends of the needle-bars, a rack held to the needleframe so as to mesh with the gears, and .a camoperated lever mechanism for operating the rack and turning the needlebars, substantially as described. - 14. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a shuttle-frame carrying perforated shuttlecases, of perforated shuttles adapted to fit within the cases, and shuttlesprings adapted to extend through the shuttles and provided with laterally-extending pins to project through the perforations of the shuttles and cases, substantially as described. 15. In a hair-working machine, the combi nation, with perforated shuttle-cases, of perforated shuttles adapted to fit. within the cases, and shuttle -springs comprising two members adapted to enter the shuttles, said members having Oll their on ter sides laterallyextending pins to project through the perforations in the shuttles and shuttle-cases,sub stantially as shown and described. 10. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a sh u ttle-f rame carrying shuttles, as described, of parallel longitudinally-movable shafts centrally mounted in pivoted bearings, arms secured to the forward ends of the shaft and to the shuttle-frame, and camoperated mechanism for tilting, sliding, and turning the shaft, substantially as described. 17. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a shuttle-frame carrying shuttles, as described, of parallel shafts centrally mounted in pivoted bearings and held to slide therein, arms connecting the forward ends of the shafts with the shuttle-frame, revoluble cam-pulleys having irregular grooved faces and having double side grooves, and connections between the shafts and the cam-pulleys, substantially as described. 18. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with parallel shafts which carry the shuttle -frame, said shafts being centrally mounted in pivoted hearings in which they slide and turn,of double cam-pulleys having irregularlyslotted faces and having camgrooves in the sides, vertical rods clamped to ICC the shafts and extending through the grooves in the pulley-faces, said shafts carrying side trucks which run in side grooves of the pulleys, and elbow-levers pivoted in the rear of thepulleys, said levers having their lower arms connected with the side grooves of the pulleys and their upper arms pivotally-connected with the rear ends of the parallel shafts, substantially as described. 1.). In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a movable shuttle-frame carrying shuttles, as described, of parallel shafts connected by depending arms with the shut tle-frame, said shafts being centrally mounted in pivoted bearings in which they slide and turn, cam-operated mechanism for operating the shafts, and guides for the shafts,substantially as described. 20. In a hair-working machinc,a cloth-carrying carriage comprising opposite plates held to slide and connected at their upper ends by an inclined cross-bar, and spring rollers mounted in the front and rear portions of the carriage and adapted to hold the cloth, substantially as shown and described. 21. In a hair-working machine, a cloth-carrying carriage comprising opposite side plates held to slide, as described, an inclined crossbar connecting the upper extremities of the plates, spring-rollers mounted in the front and rear portions of the carriage to support the cloth, and revoluble feed-rolls mounted between the plates above one of the springrollers, substantially as described. In a hair-working machine, a' cloth-carrying carriage comprising opposite side plates held to slide, as described, and connected at their upper extremities by an inclined crossbar, spring-rollers mounted in the front and rear portions of the carriage and adapted to support the cloth, a tension-rod connecting the said plates on the back side of the carriage, feed-rolls mounted in the carriage above one of the spring-rollers, and a ratchet mechanism for moving'the carriage and the feedrolls, substantially as described. 23. In a hair-working machine, the combination,with a cloth-carrying carriage mounted beneath the needle and shuttle mechanism, as described, of sprocket-wheels mounted on opposite ends of the carriage, chains extending over the sprocket-wheels and over guide-pulleys arranged beneath the sprocket-wheels, cross-rods connecting the chains, and gear mechanism for turning the sprocket-wheels, substantially as described. 24. In a hair-Working machine, the combination, with a cloth-carrying carriage and sprocket-wheels mounted thereon and provided with cam-grooves, of vertically-movable plates held to slide on the carriage-plates and provided with studs to enter the camgrooves of the sprocket-wheel, and a crossrod connecting the plates above the carriagetop, substantially as shown and described. 25. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a cloth-carrying carriage, of endless chains mounted on guide-pulleys at each end of the carriage so as to be flush with the edges of the side plates, said chains having on their outer sides projecting pins,substantially as described. 26. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a cloth carrying carriage, of spring-rollers having longitudinal grooves therein, and a rod or wire to fit the grooves, substantially as described. 27. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a cloth-carryin carriage having an inclined cross-bar at the top and spring rollers at the front and rear, of aprons secured to the spring-rollers and adapted to support a cloth, substantially as described. 28. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a sliding cloth-carrying carriage, of a revoluble cam-pulley arranged at one end of the carriage, and an arm secured to the carriage and provided at one end with a stud which enters a groove of the cam-pulley, substantially as described. 29. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a sliding cloth-carrying carriage, of a revoluble shaft arranged at one end of the carriage and carrying a cam-pulley, an arm 'secured to the carriage and having a stud thereon to enter the groove of the campulley, a ratchet-wheel fixed to the shaft, a pawl-post pivoted on the shaft and carrying a pawl to engage the ratchet-wheel, and a lever connection between the pawl-post and the main driving-shaft, substantially .as described. 30. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a sliding carriage, a revoluble shaft mounted at one end of the carriage and carrying a cam-pulley, and an arm connecting the cam-pulley and carriage, of a ratchetwheel fixed to the shaft, a movable pawlpost arranged adjacent to the ratchet-wheel and carrying a pawl to engage the latter, a vertical walking-beam having one end connected with the pawl-post, and an eccentric-rod extending from the main driving-shaftand connecting with the upper end of the walkingbeam, substantially as described. 31. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with. the carriage feed-rolls, of a revoluble cam-pulley shaft connected with the carriage, as described, and having at its inner end a double-pointed cam, a ratchetwheel fixed to the shaft of one of the feedrolls, a pawl-post pivoted adjacent to the ratchet-wheel and having a pawl to engage the latter, and a sliding rod pivoted to the pawl-post and having a shoulder extending into the path of the double-pointed cam, substantially as described. In a hair-working machine, the combination, with a ratchet-wheel which carries feed-rolls and a movable pawl-post connected therewith, of a spring held to pull forward on the pawl-post, and means for adjusting I the tension of the spring, substantially as depost, and a spring having one end secured to scribed. the adjustable rod and the opposite end to IO 33. In a hair-working machine, the combithe pawl-post, substantially as described. nation, with a ratchet-wheel which carries 5 feed-rolls and amovable pawl-post connected GEORGE A. \VILLIAMS. therewith, of a rigid post arranged adjacent Vitnesses: t0 the pawl-post, a rod secured to the pawl- RICHARD J. GOss, post and adjustably connected with the rigid GEORGE WV. ANDERSON.

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Cited By (2)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2625125-AJanuary 13, 1953Russell Lacey Mfg CompanyLoop-forming attachment for tufting machines
    US-2667879-AFebruary 02, 1954Mazeko Entpr IncApparatus for implanting hair in manikins, dolls, and the like