Automatic railroad-switch.

Abstract

Claims

No. 664,297. Patented Dec. [8,. I900. R. n. SEIBERT; AUTOMATIC RAILROAD SWITCH. (Application filed m .7, 1900. (No Model.) 3 Sheets'8heat I. Patented Dec. l8, I900. R. D. SEIBERT. AUTOMATIC RAILROAD SWITCH. (Application filed May 7, 1900.) @ Sheets-Sheet 2. (No Model.) m5. 664,297. Patented m. I8. 1900. R. n. .S EIBERT. AUTOMATIC RAILROAD SWITCH. 3 Sheets-Sheet 3. (Application Bled (No Model.) UNITED STATES. PATENT Genres. ROBERT D. SEIBERT, OF MILLVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR OF HALFTO JACKSON ROBBINS, OF SAME PLACE; ONE- AUTOMATIQJRA!LROAD-SWlTCl-ii, SPECIFICATION forming part of teeters Patent No. 664,297, dated December is, 1906. Application filed May '7, 1900. Serial No. 15,776- (No model.) v To aZZ whom it may concern.- Be it known thatl, ROBERT D. SEIBERT, a citizen of the United States, residing at Millville, in the county of Columbia and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Automatic Railroad- Switches; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same. This invention relates to switches for railroads, its object being to provide a mechanism of novel construction for automatically locking, releasing, throwing, and resetting the switch, said mechanism being actuated from the moving train by means of a trip applied to the car and under control of the engineer and a companion trip located upon the track and adapted to be struck by the trip of the car. The switch. -throwing mechanism is normally locked and is released by the combined action of the weight of a car and the trips, the weight of the car serving to set the looking mechanism so as to be released when the trips strike aud the trips through intermediate connections serving to liberate the looking mechanism,'whereby the switch is enabled to be opened or closed, as required. The switch is' thrown or actuated by power stored in a weight or a spring, which is wound. and normally held in restraint by the locking mechanism, the latter when released in the manner set forth permitting the operating mechanism to move and throw the switch. The invention also consists of the novel features, details of construction, and'combination of the parts, which hereinafter will be more fully disclosed and finally claimed, and for this purpose and also to acquire a'knowledge of the merits of the invention and the structural details of the means whereby the results are attained reference is to be had to the appended description and the drawings hereto attached. While the essential and characteristic features of the invention are necessarily susceptible of modification, still the preferred embodimentof the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a perspective view of a switch and the actuating mechanism therefor, the latter embodying the vital features of the in: vention. Fig. 2 is a top plan View. Fig. 3 is a transverse section on the line X X of Fig. 2, showing the signal in cooperative relation. Fig. 4 is a detail view in perspective of the releasing mechanism, the dotted lines showiug its operation. Fig. 5 is a section on the line Y Y of Fig. 2. Fig. 6 is a detail view of the depressible bar applied to a rail of the main track for setting the lock releasing mechanism. Fig. 7is a fragmentary view of the truck, showing more clearly the trip mechanism carried thereby for throwing and resetting the switch. Fig. 8 is a transverse section of the truck. Fig. 9 is a detail perspective view of the upper portion of the signal. Fig. 10 is a detail perspective view showing a clamp-guide for a depressible bar. Fig. 11 is a top plan view of the depressible bars and adjunctive parts as applied to the frog of the main and side rails. Fig. 12 is a side elevation of the parts shown in Fig. 11 with the near rail removed. Fig. 13 is a plan view of a modified form of means for setting the lockreleasing mechanism as applied to the main and side tracks. Fig. 14 is a detail section on the line Z Z of Fig. 13. Fig. 15 is a top plan view of a modified form of gearing for transmitting movement to the switch rod or bar. Corresponding and like parts' are referred to in the following description and indicated in all the views of the drawings by the same reference characters. " The main track 1, siding or branch 2, and switch 3 are of ordinary construction and relative disposition, and the invention deals more particularly with the mechanisms combined with the switch-rails, whereby the latter are thrown so as to close either t-he'siding or main track. The swing ends of the switchrails are connected by means of a bar at, so as to cause said rails to move together and at all times maintain the required distance between them. At suitable points in the length of the main track and siding and at the required distance from the switch are located trips to be struck by a trip provided on the pilot or other car of the approaching train, so as to properly operate the switch. The trips consist, essentially, of vertical shafts 6 and cross-heads 7, attached about centrally to the upper ends of the respective shafts. Arms 8 project outwardly from the shafts 6 and receive one end of the connecting-rods 9. The lower ends of the shafts 6 are stepped in vertical bearings 5, applied to the ties or other convenient portion of the road-bed in such a manner as to turn freely. A coilspring 5 is fitted to the shaft 6 and located within the bearing 5 and is attached to each and serves to return the trip to a normal position after being actuated so that the cross-head 7 will stand crosswise of the track and in position to be engaged by the trip under control of the engineer or attendant of the train. The trip applied to the siding or branch 2 is preferably connected to the adjacent trip of the main track, thereby avoiding an extra length of rod,which would otherwise be required to connect it with the part to which the rods extending from the trip of the main track are attached. In order to allow for independent movement of the several trips, one end of the respective connecting-rods 9 is formed with a loop 10 to make sliding connection with a headed stud of the part to which they are attached. A shaft 11 is journaled vertically about centrally of the switch and is provided with a cross-head 12, to the opposite ends of which the respective rods 9, leading from the trips of the main track, are attached, and with an arm 13, to which the rod 14 is attached. An actuator 15 is located at one side of the main track and in form approximates the shape of an elbow-lever fulcrumed at one end and having its opposite end formed into eyes 16 to engage with one end of a pivoted bar 12. The rod 14 connects with the elbow of the actuator 15 and causes an oscillation thereof upon any one of the trips being actuated. A spring 13 cooperates with the actuator 15 to hold it in a normal position. The pivoted bar 17 and the actuator 15 normally occupy a position admitting of a movement of said actuator without imparting a corresponding movement to the bar 17, thereby preventing a malicious throwing of the switch by parties tampering with any one of the trips. A rod or bar 19 is slidably mounted in guides 20 and is provided with an arch 21, clamped or otherwise rigidly attached thereto, and a hand-lever 22 is fulcrumed at its lower end upon the part 19 and is adapted to be secured at a pointbetween its ends to the arch 21 and when positioned is made fast either by means of a suitable lock 23, consisting of a pin and a padlock, or by means of a handlatch 22. A rod or bar 24 connects the handlever 22 with the adjacent switch-rail 3 and causes the parts 3, l9, and 24 to move in unison when the hand-lever 22 is made fast to the arch 21. This construction admits of the switch being operated by hand independently of the automatic actuating means. A longitudinal shaft 25 is geared to a transverse shaft 26 and is provided at its outer end with either an eccentric 27, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 3, oracrank27, as shown in Fig. 15, to which the inner end of a rod 28 is connected, so as to have a longitudinal reciprocating movement imparted thereto, said rod 28 being connected with the rod or bar 19. The transverse shaft 26 is provided with a longitudinal slotted arm 29, having a wrist-pin 30 adjustable in its slot and connected by means of a rod 31 with the slide 32. The shafts 25 and 26 are mounted in a frame and are connected by means of bevel-gears 34 and 35, which are of different relative speeds. An oscillatory movement imparted to the arm 29 will cause a reciprocating movement of the bar 4 and a throwing of the switch in the proper direction, so as to close either the siding or the main track. The slide 32 is mounted upon spaced parallel guide-rods 36, secured at their ends in vertical posts projecting from plates 37, secured to the base carrying the operating parts, said posts being connected by cross-pieces 38. The lock-bar 39 has pivotal connection with the slide 32, and its free end portion rests upon a post40,and a pressure is exerted downwardly thereon by means of a spring 41, so as to hold said lock-bar in positive engagement with the post 40. The lower edge of the lock-bar is formed with a series of notches 42, the two outermost notches adapted to engage with the post 40 and hold the slide 32 and the switch locked in either position. The two innermost notches cooperate with a releasing device 43, by means of which the lock-bar is disengaged from the post 40, so as to admit of it and the switch being thrown by the actuating mechanism. The middle notch of the series of notches 42 is common to the extreme notches and acts jointly with the post 40 and with the releasing device 43. The actuating mechanism comprises a train of gearing having the shafts of the gear elements journaled to a frame 44, and the motive power may be derived from a weight or spring, the former being preferred, and for this purpose a derrick or tower 45 is located adjacent to the track and is provided at its upper end with a pulley, over which a cord 46 or analogous device passes, one end of said cord being secured to a drum 47, forming a part of the train of gearing of the actuating mechanism and adapted to wind thereon and the other end of the cord having a weight 48 attached thereto by means of a spring connection 49, the latter serving to compensate for the shock attendant upon the quick movement and sudden stop of the actuating mechanism and attendant parts in the operation of shifting the switch. A weighted cord is adapted to be wound upon the drum 47 in any convenient and suitable manner, and, as shown, a hand-wheel 50, having olfstanding pins, is provided and secured to the projecting end of one of the shafts geared to the drum. An arm 51 is connected with the projccting end of a shaft of. the actuating gearing and is slotted at its outer end to receive a wrist-pin 52, having adjustable connection therewith and receiving one end of a rod 53, which is attached at its opposite end to the slide 32. The effective length of the arm 51 is proportioned to the stroke or sliding movement of the part 32, so that when the slide 32 is at the end of its movement in either direction the wrist-pin 52 will not stand upon a dead-center and will impart a movement to the slide in an opposite direction to its preceding movement when liberated from the restraining means holding it in check. The releasing device 43 has its upper edge inclined and disposed so as to engage with the lower edge of the lock-bar 39 andis mounted so as to swing from a vertical plane and comprises a flat bar 54, having journals at its ends, and an inclined bar 55, notched or depressed intermediate of its ends at a point in the plane of the lock-bar 39. A plate 56 is slidably mounted upon the guide 57 and is provided with vertical studs, to which the releasing device 43 is journaled, the terminal stud making loose connection with a rod 58, attached at its inner end to the swing end of the pivoted bar 17. A spring 59 acts conjunctively with the plate 56 to hold the releasing device in a normal position. A flat spring 60 passes over the fiat bar 54 and is secured at its ends and exerts a downward pressure upon said bar 54 and serves to hold the releasing device 43 in a vertical position. When the lock-bar 39 is released or disengaged from the post 40 by means of the device 43, the actuating mechanism imparts a reciprocating movement to the slide 32 in one or the other direction and causes an oscillation of the arm 29 and a reciprocating movement of the bar 4 through the intermediate connections, whereby the switch is thrown from one position to the other. Simultaneously with the longitudinal movement of the lock-bar 39 the releasing device 43 will be turned from a vertical position by reason of the action of the spring 60. The pivoted bar 17 is fulcrumed at a point between its ends, as at 61, and the end adjacent to the rod 58 normally stands clear of theactuator 15 and is directed in its movements by means of a guide 62. The rod 58 involves a sectional construction and is capable of be-' ing lengthened and shortened, the parts being connected by a screw-thread joint, and the end passing through the terminal lug of the plate 56 is headed. This construction admits of the bar 17 having a limited movement without imparting any motion to the releasing device 43, whereby provision is had for bringing the end of the bar 17 within the path of the actuator 15, so as to be engaged thereby and elfect a release of the switch-locking mechanism to permit of a free actuation of the operating mechanism when one of the trips 5 is struck by the corresponding trip of the approaching or receding train. Means are provided to be actuated by the in its bearings. wheels or other portion of the train to throw the bar 17 within the path of the actuator, whereby the switch may be thrown upon a trip being actuated, and said means consist, essentially, of a depressible bar 63, located adjacent to a rail of the track and in such a position so as to be engaged by the wheels of the trucks, and the downward movementimparted to said bar is utilized by means of intermediate connections to cause an initial movement of the pivoted bar 17 sufficient to bring it within the path of the actuator to be operated thereby when the trip is struck to effect a releasing of the switch and the switch actuating mechanism, whereby the latter through the connections and instrumentalities herein described throws the switch in the required direction. A depressible bar is provided for each trip, and the adjacent depressible bars at the frog formed between the rails of the main and side tracks are connected as shown at 64 and appear of approximately V form. The V-shaped depressible bar 64 and the straight bar 63 are mounted upon springs in such a manner as to normally project above the tread of the adjacent rails, so as to be engaged by the flanges of the wheels, by means of which they are lowered' to effect a setting of the releasing device, so as to be operated by the actuator. The depressible bar 63 is provided at its ends with grooved pulleys 65 to travel upon vertical guides formed by reducing the edges of plates 66, clamped to the rail adjacent to the bar 63. A shaft 67 extends lengthwise 0f the bar 63 and is journaled in bearings applied to the end portions of the ties and is formed with crank portions 68, connected by links 69 with the bar 63. The parts are so disposed that when the bar 63 is depressed the shaft 67 is turned in its bearings,and advantage is taken of this movement to shift a push-bar 70, by means of which the pivoted bar 17 is initially moved to bring it within the path of the actuator 15. The push-bar 70 is directed in its movements by being mounted in suitable guides, and the end adjacent to the bar 17 is widened or forked to insure positive engagement thereof with the said bar. A crank 71 is provided in the length of the shaft 67, and the push-bar 70 is connected thereto and is operated thereby when the shaft 67 is turned The depressible bars are of such relative length as to extend some distance in advance of the respective trips, whereby they are engaged by the approaching train prior to the actuation of the trips. Hence the releasing mechanism is set in advance of the operation of the trip, whereby when the latter is engaged by the trip of the train the switch will be thrown. The V- shaped depressible bar 64 is mounted at its ends upon crank portions of transversely-disposed shafts 72 and 73, the shaft 72 extending across the road-bed of the siding 2 and having a crank 74 at its outer end, to which a spring 75 is attached. This spring 75 serves to hold the shaft 72 in such aposition as to maintain the part 64 in a normal position. A bell-crank lever 76 is located in proximal relation to the slide 32, and one arm is connected by means of a wire or analogous connection 77 with the crank 74:, the opposite member being attached to a push-bar 78, disposed to engage with the pivoted bar 17, so as to throw it within the path of the actuator when the part 64 is depressed. When the foremost wheel of the pilot of an approaching train strikes a depressible bar, the latter is moved downward and through the connections described imparts an initial movement to the pivoted bar 17 sufficient to throw it within the path of the actuator, and when the trip is operated the releasing device 43 is moved and lifts the lock-bar 39 sufficiently far to disengage it from the post or stop 40, when the actuating mechanism will come into play and effect a shipping of the switch. A signal is conveniently positioned with reference to the switch and is connected with the operating mechanism thereof, so as to indicate to the engineer of the approaching train the condition of the switch, whereby the latter may be thrown in the event of its not being in proper position for the train. This signal consists of a stand 79, disposed at one side of the track and having its upper portionconstructed to receive a lantern 80, side lights 81,a semaphore 82 and arms bearing colored glasses 83, which indicate danger at night when turned so as to aline with the side lights 81. A shaft 84 is located at the upper end of the stand and carries the arms 85, hearing the colored glasses 83 at their outer ends. A corresponding shaft 86 is located at the lower end of the stand 79, and a rod or wire 87 connects corresponding arms of the said shafts 84 and 86, whereby the two are caused to turn in unison. The rod 19, attached to the near or outer switch-rail 3, connects with an arm 88 of the shaft 86. The parts are so proportioned and disposed that when the switch is operated the signal is correspondingly moved to indicate the relation of the switch with reference to the main and side tracks. When the road is clear, the semaphore is lowered and at night the white side lights indicate safety; but should the switch be open the semaphore will indicate danger by day and the red lights 83 will give warning at night. A truck 89 of a train will be provided with two trips 90, located upon opposite sides of a medial line and adapted to be independently actuated, so as to be projected within the path of the trips 5. their vertical movements by a guide-frame 91, applied to a ballast of the truck. Shafts are journaled to the truck and are provided at their ends with cranks 92, and 93 of different relative lengths, the inner cranks 92 carrying the trips 90 and the outer cranks 93 cooperating with slotted ends 94 of springactuated bars 95, by means of which the These trips 90 are directed in trips 30 are normally held elevated out of the pat-h of the trips 7. Bars 95 are loosely mounted in a bolster or other part of the truck and project through the floor or platform a sufiicient distance to be pressed upon by the foot of the engineer, fireman, or other person, whereby the trips 90 can be pro jeeted into the path of the trips 5 when required. These bars 95 have their lower ends slotted to receive the outer cranks 93 and are composed of sections having screwthread connection, so as to be lengthened and shortened to project the upper ends 95 a greater or less distance above the floor or platform of the truck. The parts being assembled substantially as set forth and indicated in the accompanying drawings, the actuating mechanism for throwing the switch is wound so as to cause a movement of the lock-bar 39 the instant it is re= leased from the post 40 by means of the instrumentalities herein specifically referred to. In order to prevent tampering with the switch, the pivoted bar 17 normally lies beyond the path of the actuator 15 and is adapted to be set by the train pressing upon any one of the depressible bars. As the train approaches the switch it comes in contact with the depressible bar and sets the releasing mechanism, and a moment later when the trip 5 is struck by one of the trips 90 the releasing device 43 is moved and disconnects the switch and switch actuating locking mechanism and permits said actuating mechanism to come into play and throw the switch. At each movement of the slide 32 the switch and its actuating mechanism are locked, and the switch cannot be thrown until first released. It is to be understood that the switch is adapted to be operated by hand at any time by means of the hand-lever 22, which can be disconnected from the arch 21. When the depressible bars are designed for the frog, they are connected so as to present a V-shaped appearance, as shown at 64 in Figs. 1 and 11; but when arranged a distance from the frog and alongside parallel portions of the track they will assume the form shown in Fig. 13. The bars 63 shown, in Fig. 13 are mounted in substantially the same manner as the corresponding part shown in Fig. 6 and are directed in their vertical movements by clamp-guides 96. (Shown most clearly in Fig. 10.) The intermediate clamp-guides have their ends open, whereas the terminal guides are closed at their outer ends, as shown in Figs. 10 and 13, to prevent longitudinal movement of the bars. A shaft 73 extends transversely of the tracks and is provided with crank portions 97 to be engaged by the bars 63 and with an outer crank 74, to which the rod 77 connects for actuating the pushbar 78. An arm 98 is secured to the shaft 73 and is acted upon by aspring 99, which serves to return the shaft and parts to a normal position. Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new is 1. In a rai [road-switch and actuat ing means therefor, a lock forsecuring the switch in an adjusted position,an actuator operatively con nected with the trips disposed along the main and side tracks, a releasing device normally out of the path of the actuator, and means to be operated by the train in advance of striking the trip to throw the releasing device within the path of the actuator, whereby when .the trip is struck by the train the releasing device is actuated and the switch unlocked, substantially as set forth. 2. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism therefor and a lock for holding the switch in either position, an actuator operatively connected with the trips located along the main and side tracks, a releasing device normally held out of the path of the actuator, and independent means conjunctively related with reference to the releasing device and operatively connected with primary operating devices located along the length of the main and side tracks to be actuated in advance of operating the trips, whereby the releasing device is thrown in the path of the actuator, substantially as set forth. 3. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism therefor and means for locking the switch in either position, an actuator operatively connected with the trips located in the length of the main and side tracks, a releasing device normally held out of the path of the actuator, movable bars located adjacent to the respective trips, and connecting means between said movable bars and the releasing device to project the latter within the path of the actuator prior to the actuation of the trip, substantially as set forth. 4. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism therefor and means forlocking the switch, an actuator operatively connected with the trips located in the length of the main and side tracks, a releasing device mounted to swing from a vertical plane and normally tending to assume its primitive position, a movable bar connected with the releasing device and normally held out of the path of the actuator, and means adapted to be operated by the train in advance of striking the trip so as to throw said movable bar in the path of the actuator, substantially as set forth. 5. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism therefor and means for locking the switch in either posit-ion, a releasing device mounted for sliding and pivotal movements, a spring disposed to return the releasing device to a normal position,a movable bar connected with the releasing device and normally held out of the path of the actuator, and means adapted to be actuated by the passing train for throwing said movable bar within the path of the actuator, substantially as set forth. 6. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism therefor and means for locking the switch, a releasing device mounted for sliding and bar in the path of the actuator, substantially as specified. 7. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism thereforand means for locking the switch, an actuator operatively connected with the trips along the main and side tracks, a slide, a releasing device mounted upon the slide and adapted to swing laterally from a vertical position and adapted to automatically assume its primitive position when released, a movable bar loosely connected with the said slide and normally held out of the path of the actuator, and means adapted to be operated by the moving train to throw the said movable bar in the path of the actuator, substantially as set forth. 8. In a railroad-switch,- actuating mechanism therefor and means for locking the switch, a releasing device, a pivoted bar operatively connected With the releasing device and normally held out of the path of the actuator, a push-bar, and a depressible bar operatively connected with'the push-bar to give an initial movement to the pivoted bar for throwing it in the path of the actuator, substantially as set forth. 9. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism therefor and means forlocking the switch, an actuator operatively connected with the trips located in the length of the main and side tracks, a releasing device, a bar pivoted between its ends and operatively connected with the releasing device and normally held out of the path of the actuator, positivelydisposed push-bars arranged to act upon the pivoted bar upon opposite sides of its fulcrum, depressible bars disposed adjacent to the aforementioned trips, and means connecting said depressible bars with the pushbars, whereby a movement of any one of the depressible bars will effect an initial movement of the pivoted bar to throw it within the path of the actuator, substantially as set forth. 10. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, a looking mechanism for securing the switch in either position and holding the actuating mechanism in restraint, and a releasing device adapted to be actuated by a passing train through the instrumentalities of trips and intermediate connections, substantially as set forth. '. '11. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, a lock device for securing the switch and holding the switch-operating mechanism in restraint, a releasing device mounted for pivotal and sliding movements, and means for actuating the releasing device by means of a passing l lever fulcrumed to the slidable bar, a rod train, substantially as set forth. 12. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, a lockbar disposed to secure the switch and hold the switch-operating mechanism in restraint, a releasing device conjunctively related with reference to the lock-bar and mounted for pivotal and sliding movements, a spring disposed to maintain the lock-bar in a normal position with reference to the stop cooperating therewith, and means actuated by the passing train to operate the releasing device, substantially as set forth. 13. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, a lockbar for securing the switch and holding the switch operating mechanism in restraint, shafts disposed relatively at a right angle and connected with respectively the switch and the switch-operating mechanism, and means adapted to be actuated by the passing train for operating the releasing device, substantially as set forth. 14. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, a locking mechanism for securing the switch and holding the switch-operating mechanism in restraint, means for effecting a release of the locking mechanism, and a hand-lever interposed in the connections between the switchoperating mechanism and the switch to admit of the latter being independently thrown, substantially as set forth. 15. In a railroad-switch, actuating means therefor including a locking mechanism, a rod or bar slidably mounted and connected with the switch-operating mechanism, a handconnecting the hand-lever with the switch to admit of the latter being independently thrown at any time, and means for locking thehand-leverto the aforementioned slidablymounted bar, substantially as set forth. 16. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, aslide, right-angularly-disposed shafts, rods connecting crank-arms of the actuating mechanism and one of the last-mentioned shafts with the said slide, connections between the other one of the said shafts and switch, a lock-bar pivot-ally connected with the said slide and conjunctively related with reference to a post or stop, and a releasing device to cooperate with the lock-bar, substantially asset forth. 17. In a railroad-switch, actuating mechanism for positively throwing the switch, alocking mechanism for holding the switch-operating mechanism in restraint and securing the switch in either position, a releasing mechanism, a hand-lever interposed in the connections between the switch and its actuating mechanism for independent operation of the switch, and a signal having connection with the connecting means between the switch and its actuating mechanism so as to be 0perated either by hand or by the automatic switch-actuating inechan ism,substantially as set forth. In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses. ROBERT D. SEIBERT.

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